Dr. Maxim Ivanov takes readings of measured data for his research from 9 in the morning till 9 at night. And at the weekend, the Russian physicist starts evaluating his findings because Professor Bredol’s lab is closed then. “My three-month research stay here in Steinfurt is very intense – but, there again, very informative,” stated Max, who works for the Institute of Electrophysics in Yekaterinburg.
Professor Bredol supervises Max’s research in Steinfurt.

Here in Steinfurt, Max conducts research into nanopowders, which are used to produce high-performance ceramics. These ceramics, featuring optical properties, are produced for technical applications such as innovative, highly powerful lasers and laser systems. Max investigates the best way to shape the nanopowder for all these uses. “It’s great to be able to address this topic from so many different perspectives,” he enthused. “In Russia, I work with a really powerful laser technology and manage to splinter material to nanosize particles. Here in Steinfurt, my colleagues and I consider the topic in the lab from a chemical perspective. Very accurately and precisely, nanoparticle by nanoparticle, we are developing an intelligent, refined technique that enables the nanoparticles to be composed into larger entities with novel properties.”

»It’s great to be able to address this topic from so many different perspectives.«Dr. Maxim Ivanov

Which is worthwhile. “During my three months of research here, I have been able to generate more results than in the last two years in Russia.” One reason for this success is the unique equipment at the university; another extremely important factor is the scientist’s ability to exchange ideas with his colleagues and to collaborate in an interdisciplinary manner. Max first came across Münster University of Applied Sciences in 2010 when attending a Laser Ceramics Symposium run by our Institute for Optical Technologies (IOT) in Münster. This is where Max first met Professor Bredol and Professor Kynast. Two years later the scientists met again, this time at a conference on nanophosphors in Wroclaw. “They told me about the German Academic Exchange Service programme, which funds my research stay here,” explained Max. In fact, he is very well travelled, having already conducted research in countries such as China, Poland and the USA.

Max’s research involves the use of all kinds of filters in the spectrometer. (Photos: Theresa Gerks)
Max’s research involves the use of all kinds of filters in the spectrometer. (Photos: Theresa Gerks)
The Russian physicist manages to keep track of all his samples.
The Russian physicist manages to keep track of all his samples.
Max’s research focuses on luminescence of the nanopowders.
Max’s research focuses on luminescence of the nanopowders.

Sometimes the 47-year-old scientist treats himself to a Sunday off. Then he gets on his bike and cycles through the countryside and the surrounding villages. “That’s what I enjoy most,” stated Max. “I cycle 40 or 50 kilometres a day, stopping to rest at brooks and ponds – or sit in a café enjoying cappuccino and apple strudel.”

By Theresa Gerks


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